AP Gov 10/31/11

{summary} Today we took a break from data and watched a lecture on how cognitive framing may influence the political socialization into the categories of conservatism and liberalism. Think about this in terms of family as the primary factor in political socialization. This is George Lakoff, a cognitive linguist talking about "moral politics." Students took notes. Here's the link: George Lakoff Lecture on Moral Politics Here's a link to some more explanations about Lakoff's ideas:Metaphor, Morality, and Politics Assignment: Finish reading the packet interactively (the text packet).

Gov A 10/31/11

{summary} Today we went over the "Your Best Educated Guess" handout from last week. We then talked about American Political Culture using these slides: Political_Culture_Notes_10_31_11.pdf Assignment: For Wednesday read 44-49 (the last two articles). We will have a Socratic Seminar on the two readings on that day. Make sure to have both interactively read.

Gov A 10/28/11

{summary} Today we finished Lakoff's lecture on Moral Politics. We followed it up with Colbert's interview with Frank Luntz (mentioned by Lakoff) Frank Luntz Focus Group for Colbert Students also saw a clip on the Bonus Army history that had been on Rachel Maddow's program this week. Frank Rich talks about the Bonus Army History This is all pretty liberal. We'll balance next week. Right now, all I want to do is sleep and have some consistent schedules in my life. Tough week. I'll start reading your Moodles Sunday night. Have a good weekend.

AP Gov 10/28/11

{summary} Here's the notes from today:AP_Poli_Socialization_Notes_10_28_11.pdf For the weekend, take a look at the various links below. Where you might want to start is to look at the following: 2011 Pew Typology Groups. To read about the various categories, click on each name in the list. Especially interesting are the similarities between "Disaffecteds" (a republican category) and "Hard-pressed democrats". This is one of the surveys you took. We will look at class data this next week and start to analyze it relative to national data. Data Links for Comparison to National Patterns and Trends: 1. New York Times Presidential Election Exit Polls These are the ones we examined in class and have lots of the demographic data we talked about. This may be a place to start if you are confused. 2. Where Do You Fit? Pew Research Typology Study This study includes lots of demographic data and divides Democrats and Republicans up into more specific groups. The education information is interesting, especially showing "disaffecteds" and "hard-pressed democrats" in such similar circumstances. You might want to take a look. 3. Larry J Sabato's Crystal Ball This articles is from 2010 and makes projections about the 2010 midterm, so it is a bit out of date. But within it are some good demographic statistics that you might find useful and interesting. Scroll down a ways in the article to find these. 4. Voter Registration Rates from Pew Research This takes a bit of manipulations, but there is quite a bit of data that is useful for you. Make sure if you use it, that you note that it is the (Pew Voter Registration Rates). Don't just say (Pew). 5. Glass_Study_on_Family_from_1986.doc. This is short and concise and similar to the information you've read in the reading packet and seen on the lecture slides. But, because it is from the 1980s, it may be a bit more relevant to your parents' generation than the study done in 1992. 6.African-Americans, Anger, Fear and Youth Propel Turnout to Highest Level Since 1964--Possible Pro-Democratic Realignment, GOP Disaster. Published by Media Relations. Pdf copy available on website. Media Relations 2008 Turnout PDF 7. Voter Registration Rates for Mid-term Elections, The Pew Center on the States: Voter Registration Rates--Pew Center on the States This is an interactive website that shows self-reported figures for education level, age, gender, and race for participation in mid-term elections. These figures are likely high, but interesting because they are broken down by states, so you can see Washington State in particular. You’ll have to play with the pull out and drop downs to find your way around it, but worth a look. 8. New American Electorate from The Immigration Policy Center. Although this report does not break down data by political party, given that you have information about party preference of immigrants from other sources, it could prove useful as a supplementary source.New American Electorate from Immigration Policy Center. 9. Another interesting report: Latinos and the 2010 Elections: Strong Support for Democrats; Weak Voter Motivation. 10. Wealth Gap Rise to Record Highs Between Whites, Blacks, Hispanics. You might think about this as you mix social class and race together in your hypotheses. This is a fairly recent report (July 2011). 11. "The Gender Gap". The Gender Gap by Mary J. Kaufmann. This is a 2005 study, which I referred to in class. It has a lot of good statistics and is readable.

AP Gov 10/27/11

{summary} Today we transferred our data from parent interviews and the five personal political surveys to scan cards. Tomorrow we will finish the lecture on political socialization. Assignment: Read to page 21 interactively.

Gov A 10/27/11

{summary} Today we took a break from data and watched a lecture on how cognitive framing may influence the political socialization into the categories of conservatism and liberalism. Think about this in terms of family as the primary factor in political socialization. This is George Lakoff, a cognitive linguist talking about "moral politics." Students in 4th period saw the first 44 minutes; students in 5th period saw the first 40 minutes. We will watch the rest of his lecture tomorrow. Students took notes. Here's the link: George Lakoff Lecture on Moral Politics Here's a link to some more explanations about Lakoff's ideas:Metaphor, Morality, and Politics Assignment: Moodle due tonight at 11:59. For all relevant links and materials, look at yesterday's entry.

AP Gov 10/26/11

{summary} Today we started working on political socialization. We did that after students got a stamp (jack-o-lantern) for the questions/vocab on the conservatism chapter. Here are the political socialization notes from today. We only got to the education piece--which of course, gets much discussion going. AP_Poli_Socialization_Notes_10_26_11.pdf Relevant to that, here's David Frum's comments about the changing demographics of the Republican Party, resulting in his opinion, in part, from stresses caused by the type of immigration policy the US has. David Frum talks about changing demographics in Republican Party. Frum is certainly not the only Republican or conservative intellectual who has noted these changes. Of course, it's better he say it than a liberal. Assignment: Family Tree interviews and five political surveys completed with results printed.

Gov A 10/26/11

{summary} Today students worked with data again from the collective sums of parent surveys and from the individual political surveys (5 different political surveys). I handed out this instruction sheet to work with: Looking_at_your_data_and_your_parents_data.doc. If you weren't in class, the best way to get started with this is to first go through and highlight all liberal responses on the survey results for the five student surveys. Then, go through and highlight with a different color the conservative responses. For each survey, come up with an average for both conservatives and liberals. Then, make sure to come up with an average for conservative and liberal for all five of the surveys. This will give us a good reading on class distribution since there are variations among the different surveys. Remember, the numbers of responses vary: 29, for each of the first three, 28 for the fourth, and 27 for the fifth. Here's the parent results: Family_Tree_Ballot_Questions_Oct_2011_Results_Gov_A.doc Gov_A_Individual_Survey_Results_5_Surveys_2011.doc Assignment:Students have tonight and tomorrow night to write a commentary and response on the political socialization data we have been examining. Remember that this is due tomorrow night (Thursday night at 11:59 pm.) This is an analysis assignment, so it will be in the short term pretty influential on your grade. Don't blow this off. Political_Socialization_Family_Tree_Moodle_Prompt_2011.doc Moodle_Poli_Socialization_Criteria_2011.doc Data Links for Comparison to National Patterns and Trends: 1. New York Times Presidential Election Exit Polls These are the ones we examined in class and have lots of the demographic data we talked about. This may be a place to start if you are confused. 2. Where Do You Fit? Pew Research Typology Study This study includes lots of demographic data and divides Democrats and Republicans up into more specific groups. The education information is interesting, especially showing "disaffecteds" and "hard-pressed democrats" in such similar circumstances. You might want to take a look. 3. Larry J Sabato's Crystal Ball This articles is from 2010 and makes projections about the 2010 midterm, so it is a bit out of date. But within it are some good demographic statistics that you might find useful and interesting. Scroll down a ways in the article to find these. 4. Voter Registration Rates from Pew Research This takes a bit of manipulations, but there is quite a bit of data that is useful for you. Make sure if you use it, that you note that it is the (Pew Voter Registration Rates). Don't just say (Pew). 5. Glass_Study_on_Family_from_1986.doc. This is short and concise and similar to the information you've read in the reading packet and seen on the lecture slides. But, because it is from the 1980s, it may be a bit more relevant to your parents' generation than the study done in 1992. 6.African-Americans, Anger, Fear and Youth Propel Turnout to Highest Level Since 1964--Possible Pro-Democratic Realignment, GOP Disaster. Published by Media Relations. Pdf copy available on website. Media Relations 2008 Turnout PDF 7. Voter Registration Rates for Mid-term Elections, The Pew Center on the States: Voter Registration Rates--Pew Center on the States This is an interactive website that shows self-reported figures for education level, age, gender, and race for participation in mid-term elections. These figures are likely high, but interesting because they are broken down by states, so you can see Washington State in particular. You’ll have to play with the pull out and drop downs to find your way around it, but worth a look. 8. New American Electorate from The Immigration Policy Center. Although this report does not break down data by political party, given that you have information about party preference of immigrants from other sources, it could prove useful as a supplementary source.New American Electorate from Immigration Policy Center. 9. Another interesting report: Latinos and the 2010 Elections: Strong Support for Democrats; Weak Voter Motivation. 10. Wealth Gap Rise to Record Highs Between Whites, Blacks, Hispanics. You might think about this as you mix social class and race together in your hypotheses. This is a fairly recent report (July 2011). 11. "The Gender Gap". The Gender Gap by Mary J. Kaufmann. This is a 2005 study, which I referred to in class. It has a lot of good statistics and is readable. For any of the students who were gone for games and are confused about the process, feel free to come in at lunchtime on Thursday, and I'll help you. smile
Page 1 of 5 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›