Friday, August 26, 2011

Ancient Greece

While you're waiting for my description of our ancient Greek unit, ponder this: Socrates was put to death for encouraging his students to seek truth and to think for themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don't get any ideas...

Cyclops Skull

When the ancient Greeks discovered huge bones and skulls like the one shown here on the island of Samos, they could only imagine what creature they came from. All cultures seek to explain the origins of what they find in their environment and create elaborate mythologies to answer their unknowns. For the Greeks, these bones became the stories of the cyclops, huge one-eyed beasts, children of the gods Gaia and Uranus. Today we know these remains as those of mastodons. By studying mythology through the lens of scientific knowledge we can see, in fact, that mythologies are not flights of ancient fancy but stories based in fact, truth and evidence that can shed understanding on the worlds of these people.

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